DAWN2™ Study results

DAWN2 Study results

THE IMPACT OF DIABETES ON EMOTIONAL WELL-BEING

DAWN2TM shows that living with diabetes has a negative impact on many aspects of daily life and the quality of life for people with diabetes: more than half of people with diabetes reported a negative impact on physical health and approximately half reported a negative impact on emotional well-being. One in seven people with diabetes (14%) had such a low emotional well-being score that they were likely to be suffering with depression1. Nearly half of the people with diabetes (45%) reported an elevated level of diabetes-specific emotional distress1.

NEW PERSPECTIVES ON FAMILY BURDEN AND SUPPORT

The negative impact of diabetes on quality of life is not only restricted to those people who have diabetes. The DAWN2TM study reveals that diabetes has a wide-ranging impact on the lives of family members, too.

SUPPORT FOR ACTIVE SELF-MANAGEMENT

People with diabetes require on-going support to effectively and actively self-manage their condition, which is crucial for an optimal treatment outcome.

AVAILABILITY AND USE OF EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES

While the vast majority (81%) of people with diabetes regarded the diabetes education programmes that they had attended as helpful, only 49% were participating in any such programmes. In family members of people with diabetes the gap was even greater. Approximately three quarters of family members found diabetes education programmes helpful to learn more about diabetes and to provide better support for their relatives, yet only 23% of family members participated in any diabetes educational programmes.

ACCESS TO PSYCHOSOCIAL SUPPORT

Diabetes care and support which focuses on both clinical and the psychosocial needs of people with diabetes and their families is necessary to ensure successful treaTMent outcomes. DAWN2 shows that 73% of people with diabetes received regular clinical assessments like HbA1c measurements, while only 32% reported that in the past 12 months they were asked by members of their healthcare team about being anxious or depressed1.

DISCRIMINATION AND SOCIETY

The DAWN2TM study reveals that one in five of people with diabetes feel discriminated against due to their condition. This perception is significantly more common among people with diabetes treated with insulin. People with diabetes who felt discriminated against expressed more problems living with diabetes, less perceived support and a reduced sense of well-being4.

1. Nicolucci A, et al. Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs: Second Study (DAWN2). Cross-national benchmarking of diabetes-related psychosocial outcomes for people with diabetes. Diabetic Medicine 2013;30:767-77.
2. Kovacs Burns K, et al. Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs second study (DAWN2): Cross-national benchmarking indicators for family members living with people with diabetes. Diabetic Medicine 2013; 30:778-88.
3. Holt RIG, et al. Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs second study (DAWN2): Cross-national comparisons on barriers and resources for optimal care: Healthcare professional perspective. Diabetic Medicine 2013; 30:789-98.
4. Wens J, Nicolucci A, Kalra S, et al. on behalf of the DAWN2 Study Group. Societal discrimination and emotional well-being in people with diabetes: results from DAWN2. Abstract 1142. EASD, 2013.

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